Gastrointestinal Issues in Autism: New Research

  By Gita Gupta In this post, I summarize a study from a group of well-known researchers which reveals new insights on gastrointestinal (GI) issues in autism. The study showed that the GI tract of children with autism has significant differences in mitochondrial function, compared to neurotypical children with similar GI issues. As parents like…

GUT MICROBIOME IN AUTISM

By Gita Gupta   When my son was first diagnosed with autism, he also had problems like chronic diarrhea. The diarrhea caused him a lot of distress, and he was not gaining weight or growing. We saw many specialists. When I asked them about what causes the diarrhea, I was often told “that’s just autism.”…

A 100 year old drug improves core symptoms of #autism

By Gita Gupta There are currently no medical treatments approved by the FDA for addressing the disabilities that come with autism. There is plenty of research – over 37,000 peer-reviewed papers touch on various facets of autism. Surprisingly, only a fraction of the research examines how autism affects the body and the brain in medical…

Stem Cells, Autism and New Research

By Gita Gupta Autism affects 1 in 68 U.S. children (1.) FDA-approved treatments for autism address issues like irritability, but there are very few treatments for the core symptoms like impairments in communication and behavior. That’s probably because there isn’t enough research focus on understanding and addressing the abnormal changes seen in the body’s functioning…

A blood test that predicts #autism has implications for treatment and prevention.

  Richard E Frye & John Slattery Arkansas Children’s Research Institute, Little Rock AR and Daniel Rossignol Rossignol Medical Center, Irvine CA   A recent study demonstrated that a blood test might be able to differentiate children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) from typically developing children.1 The study examined one carbon metabolism and its related…

Study Suggests the Medical Nature of #Autism Leads to Early Mortality

  By Dr. Richard Frye, TACA Physician Advisory member   A recent study in The British Journal of Psychiatry examined mortality rates in 27,122 high and low functioning Swedish individuals diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) between 1987-2009 and compared these to mortality rates to 2,672,185 randomly selected non-ASD individuals matched on gender, age and…

NEW STUDY DEMONSTRATES HOW PARENT-BABY INTERACTION MAY REDUCE AUTISM SYMPTOMS

By Dr. Bob Sears, Pediatrician and TACA Physician Advisory Member     We all know that early behavioral interventions for autism help improve a child’s developmental skills. Yet, we’ve always focused on this concept once a child is diagnosed with autism. This typically doesn’t happen until age two or three years, and behavioral therapy doesn’t…

Update: Stem cells and autism

By Lisa Ackerman As promised, we stated we would update you on the latest in stem cell research. We have written about Dr. Chez’s stem cell study in past TACA blogs (1.) As a reminder, we know stem cell therapy offer treatment solutions for many other conditions (such as leukemia, lymphoma and other serious medical…

Gastrointestinal issues in autism are real

By Dr. Elizabeth Mumper, TACA Physician Advisory Member Parents have been telling their clinicians that gastrointestinal issues (GI) have plagued their children with autism for several decades. Unfortunately, in many cases, the reported symptoms were written off as part of the autism and may not have received the thorough attention and evaluations that were warranted….

Research & Autism: Important New Developments

  By Dr. Suzanne Goh   One of the most important developments in autism research in recent years has been a focus on how the body’s biochemistry is altered in autism. Many research studies have now shown that in those with autism, the mitochondria (which are the key part of the cell that generate energy)…

Autism: It’s about the POOP Part II

  By Lisa Ackerman Once again, warning: If you are eating or you are bothered by a conversation about bowel movements, this blog is not for you. If you have a child living with autism, welcome to the most discussed topic.  If this blog sounds familiar, it should! We have written about it before (1.) …